Sleepless in Menopause: How to Find Rest in the Midst of Change

By
FemGevity Medical Team
March 28, 2024
5 min read
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Sleepless in Menopause: How to Find Rest in the Midst of Change

Lack of sleep can have serious health consequences for women in menopause. There is evidence to suggest that lack of sleep may increase the risk of dementia and Alzheimer's disease in women over 40. Studies have shown that poor sleep quality, as well as lack of sleep, may contribute to the development of these conditions.

The exact mechanisms by which lack of sleep increases the risk of dementia and Alzheimer's are not fully understood, but it is believed that poor sleep may affect the brain's ability to clear toxic proteins that accumulate in the brain and contribute to the development of these conditions.Additionally, lack of sleep may also lead to inflammation and oxidative stress in the brain, both of which are thought to contribute to the development of dementia and Alzheimer's.

Some of the most common issues associated with lack of sleep during menopause include:

  • Hormonal imbalances: Lack of sleep can disrupt the body's hormonal balance, which can lead to an increase in hot flashes, night sweats, and other menopausal symptoms.
  • Mood changes: Lack of sleep can cause mood changes, such as depression, irritability, and anxiety.
  • Cognitive impairment: Lack of sleep can affect cognitive function, leading to problems with memory, attention, and decision-making.
  • Cardiovascular disease: Lack of sleep is linked to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, which is already more prevalent during menopause.
  • Weight gain: Lack of sleep can affect appetite and metabolism, leading to weight gain.

It is important for women in menopause to prioritize sleep and make sure they are getting enough restful sleep each night. This may involve making lifestyle changes, such as setting a regular sleep schedule, avoiding stimulating activities before bedtime, and creating a comfortable sleep environment.

It's also important to note that other factors such as genetics, lifestyle, and overall health, can also play a role in the development of dementia and Alzheimer's disease.

Diabetes is a chronic condition characterized by high levels of sugar (glucose) in the blood. There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 and type 2. Type 2 diabetes, which is the most common form, is usually caused by a combination of genetic and lifestyle factors.

Research has shown that women who are postmenopausal have a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes. The decrease in estrogen levels during menopause can lead to weight gain and changes in insulin sensitivity, which can increase the risk of developing type 2 diabetes.There is also an increase in risk due to increase in body weight and decreasing muscle mass that can also occur during this time. It's important for women who are approaching or going through menopause to maintain a healthy lifestyle, including regular exercise and a balanced diet, to help reduce the risk of developing diabetes.

Untreated diabetes can have serious health consequences for women over 40, especially if the condition is not properly managed. Some of the most common complications of untreated diabetes in women over 40 include:

  • Cardio vascular disease: Diabetes can increase the risk of heart disease, stroke, and other cardiovascular problems. 
  • Kidney damage: Diabetes can cause damage to the kidneys, which can lead to kidney failure.
  • Nerve damage: Diabetes can damage the nerves, which can lead to numbness, tingling, and pain in the hands and feet.
  • Eye problems: Diabetes can cause damage to the blood vessels in the eyes, which can lead to blindness.
  • Foot problems: Diabetes can cause damage to the blood vessels in the feet, which can lead to poor circulation, making it harder to heal infections, cuts and sores.
  • Skin problems: Diabetes can cause skin problems such as fungal infections, itching, and slowhealing of cuts and sores.

It is essential that women over 40 with diabetes receive regular medical care and follow a treatment plan to manage their blood sugar levels and prevent these complications. This may involve taking medications, monitoring blood sugar levels, making life style changes, and working closely with a healthcare provider to manage the condition.

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